DESIGN SHADOW -“OAC”: A TIDLIC

“OAC” – Owner, Architect and Contractor meeting. I didn’t know that term in school, but it is a acronym thrown around weekly now. There are various types of meetings to get a project concept-ed, off the ground and running – or building – in our line of work. Once a contractor is brought on board, whether in design or just after the design is bid to a contractor to start construction, you start OAC meetings. These are usually weekly meetings where all the key players come together to discuss the projects progress and review submittals, RFI’s or CCD’s. My attendance to these meetings varies, sine the project architect os always there. But when the interior finishes start going in that is when I start participating in the meeting more regularly.

Today the Project Architect I work with was out of town, so I went to OAC with the intern Architect on the project. The meeting outline can vary by contractor or Owner. These are some of the items we discussed:

  • We started today with the contractor presenting a “safety share” – a 2 minute story of what not to do on a project site.
  • The contractor gave a report on the punch listing process and what still needs to be done.
  • We spent time talking about a number of items that are behind schedule. Most of these items are behind due to the Owner changing some designs along the way. There is some product like rubber base that is on back order and we can’t get it as early as we need it. We discussed the option of switching out that rubber base with another type of base, like carpet that we could get sooner. I will have to get with the Owner in a separate meeting to discuss the options.
  • We had quite a bit of discussion about some lighting changes that we are orchestrating. Some of the pendant lights we ordered are hanging too low in the room. We were able to add them to another location so the fixtures weren’t wasted, but these lights needed some modifications to make them work. The parts to make these modifications are taking some coordination to get here in time.
  • We spoke about the carpet installation schedule, and how the carpet installers are a little behind schedule. Because the carpet isn’t apart of the Contractor’s scope – but the Owner’s – the concerns were brought up to me to resolve.
  • We as “Architect” brought up an item of concern: Some of the wood work going in isn’t meeting specifications. It was all supposed to be hard wood trim, but the sub contractor started to install wood veneer trim that is backed by MDF substrate. This was  shock to everyone. The Contractor will have to investigate further.
  • After we discussed the schedule impacts of all of these items, the contractor brought up an item for discussion. They are concerned they aren’t going to meet Substantial Completion with so many items outstanding. This item took some time to discuss and evaluate. One of the concerns with this, is that if substantial completion is moved, it bumps the furniture installation dates, which affects Turn Over. Nothing was decided in this meeting.
  • Lastly we went around the room and each person had an opportunity to give their last “2 bits” (closing remarks) to the meeting.

These meeting are vital to the success of a project. Communication, communication, communication! And the more respectful we are of each other, the more successful these meetings turn out.

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